When’s The Last Time You Drained Your Lymph Fluids?

When’s The Last Time You Drained Your Lymph Fluids?

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The lymphatic system plays a very important role in the human body’s fight against disease. It’s largely made up of a network of thin tubes (filled with clear lymphatic fluid) and lymph nodes. The thymus, spleen and bone marrow also all play vital parts in the function of the lymphatic system.

When-Was-The-Last-Time-You-Drained-Your-Lymph-Fluids

The lymph nodes house the lymphatic fluid which contains lymphocytes and other white blood cells, vital components of our blood that fight infection and cancer.

If our lymph fluids get backed up in the nodes or if there are problems with our lymph ducts, it can cause the nodes to swell and become inflamed, on top of compromising the body’s immune system. [1]

White blood cells are the primary reason why the lymphatic system is so important. If your blood is drawn during a medical checkup, WBC levels are one of the things your doctor will look at in determining if you have an infection. When pathogens invade the body, white blood cells exit the lymph nodes and enter the bloodstream to fight the infection – this is characterized typically by two things: a fever and a high WBC count. Low WBC counts in the presence of a fever can signify a problem with your immunity. [2]

Unlike the cardiovascular system however, the lymphatic system is not a closed system – and in humans it does not have a pump. This means that the movement of the lymph fluid relies on the physical movement of the body in order to circulate and prevent the nodes and ducts from becoming blocked with dead white blood cells. Without adequate movement of the fluid, lymph nodes can become infected and disturb the normal homeostasis in the body’s immune and vascular systems. In the brain, a lack of lymph drainage can damage memory and contribute to Alzheimer’s disease. The same thing happens when the lymph nodes near our major organ systems don’t flow and drain effectively – it can cause widespread organ dysfunction. [3]

Certain kinds of movement and exercise are regarded as beneficial to the lymphatic system as they assist the movement and drainage of the lymph.

Natural Drainage Of Lymph: 3 Methods

#1: Massage

This method is one of the most popular ways to manually drain your lymph nodes, particularly in areas like the breast and armpit. When massaging the breast, gently make circular motions that lead away from the areola and towards the armpit, then downwards. This promotes drainage of the lymph fluid away from the nodes of the breast and axilla to the body’s vasculature. You can also apply this technique to other lymph nodes of the body. [4]

#2: Exercise

Another way to effectively get all your lymph nodes properly drained is to exercise! Moderate exercise that helps improve vascular circulation also promotes adequate drainage of lymph fluid, about two to three times better than not doing any exercise at all. This is because lymph flow in and out of the nodes is increased during exercise. You can try jogging, walking, cycling, or other similar exercises for at least 30 minutes, three times a week to promote proper drainage of your lymph nodes. [5]

#3: Rebound Therapy

This last method is technically a form of exercise but warrants its own special focus as a unique and valuable drainage method. Rebound therapy is slowly gaining recognition for a variety of health benefits that range from physical to emotional. Have you ever wondered why kids instinctively want to bounce – on anything from a bouncy castle to your newly made double bed? There might be something to it… it’s really good for your health!

Through gentle bouncing or rebounding on a trampoline (or similar surface), circulation and lymph drainage is improved, aside from promoting an increased state of wellbeing. The science behind it lies with the lymph ducts’ valves. In this regard, bouncing can be likened to a more intense form of walking. When pressure is placed on the lower extremities (when you prepare for a bounce or take a step), the valves in the lymph ducts close and open when the pressure is released. When you bounce, the valves close and open more fully than walking or jogging, promoting better lymph fluid evacuation. [6][7]

Many people who are into this exercise obtain a special rebounding trampoline – a portable 36″ (or similar size) mini-trampoline that allows them to get in their bounce time. It’s a great form of exercise and lots of fun – just put on your favorite music and bounce to it, what could be more awesome than that? 🙂 Here’s an example of a rebounding trampoline on Amazon that got TONS of great reviews if you want to learn more: Stamina 36 inch Folding Trampoline

References: herbs-info.com

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